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Just when you thought a cat intensely chasing a laser pointer couldn’t get anymore engrossing, along comes an adorable toddler trying to help the cat get that pesky red dot. Prepare for the implosion of the entire Internet.

….

The human caretaker of the cat and child posted video of the encounter to YouTube. “His name is Phineas (2.5 years), the Cat is Muon (about 1 year),” the poster explained. “Phin had never seen the pointer before, and neither had Muon….My child and cat are on the same wavelength.”

(Source: jezebel.com)

  6:02 pm, reblogged  by apistat-chaekoos, [ 841 notes ]


i have bad taste in late night text posts but good taste in friends, i love u all

  2:04 pm, by apistat-chaekoos, [ 3 notes ]


daedalus:icarus, whatever you do, dont fly too close to the sun

icarus:

icarus:im gonna fuck the sun

  2:03 pm, reblogged  by apistat-chaekoos, [ 23,066 notes ]


churayl:

Pakistan is not your talking point, it isn’t your political news of the day, the trending global current affair you want to learn so you seem more cultured to your friends. It’s not your choice blogging topic. It isn’t Gaza or Ferguson. Sometimes spreading awareness can backfire and do more harm than good. Why are you caring about Pakistan now when this protest was under way for the last two weeks and when many people were discontented with the Nawaz regime for the past year? How can you say anything about it when you don’t take loadshedding into account and in fact have never sweltered in the summer without air conditioning because the circulation of electricity is limited and available foremost to the rich and privileged, something directly contributing to the people’s agitation? How can you say anything about it when you know nothing about the military dictatorship Pakistanis suffered in the 1990s and the recent 2000s? Are you only caring about it now because the crisis has escalated, friction and violence have increased and it’s going to make headlines and receive more attention? You will view this event in an isolated vacuum, decontextualized from the factors that produced it in the first place. Martial law is imminent. The bourgeois democracy we suffered has all the traits of a regime, but a military coup cannot help us again. 

My only request is to be sensitive in how you circulate information. My only request is that you don’t sensationalize it. My only request is that you don’t use language that trivializes and insults the people on the ground just because they’re faraway from you. You cannot understand a political crisis without knowing the 60+ year long history of the country, its institutional dynamics, the praetorianism that has characterized the state since its inception. And most importantly, you cannot understand this without knowing the mood, hope and aspirations of the people in the face of mass poverty, government corruption and military subjugation. The masses are being manipulated and used as pawns. Their rightful rage against bourgeois democracy that is both class exploitative and repressive in freedom of speech is being coopted by highly opportunistic and dishonest politicians cum demagogues, Tahir al-Qadri and Imran Khan, who care more about expanding their power than on nation-building and helping the people, and who are most likely in cahoots with the military. Seasoned Pakistani activist Lal Khan described it best

Khan is a right-wing politician with religious and national chauvinism at the core of his ideological bearings. Qadri is an impostor mixing religious mysticism and demagogic sloganeering including references to poverty, deprivation and welfare, but this is more rhetorical than any serious programme. Both are staunch supporters of free market economics, foreign investment and neoliberal capitalism and, hypothetically speaking, if they ever came into power, they would be steered by the military, imperialism, and financial institutions like the World Bank and the IMF…

and

The PTI of Imran Khan, with its azaadi march, has no real solution for the woes of the populace. Qadri’s revolution does not even have a name, what to say of a concrete programme or a strategy. Both totally fail to call for even the basic of human needs, i.e. free health and education. They will not dare call for the nationalisation of corporate vultures known as the IPPs to end the curse of load shedding. The PTI leadership is actually a reunion of old Aitchisonians. None of them would ever call for the nationalisation of their mother institution, built by the British imperialists to create and educate a class for the perpetuation of their colonial rule. It is an institution reflecting the grandeur of the colonial and postcolonial elite, disgustingly slavish to their imperialist bosses.

Health and education are the most profitable businesses after the drug trade and ransom in today’s Pakistan. Both these radical forces cannot touch these and other leeching enterprises as their support and finances are dependent on these very entrepreneurs and imperialist monopolies. For that matter, all political parties of the present bourgeois political order are representatives of these different black and grey crony capitalist and feudal classes. These ‘freedom’ and ‘revolution’ marches are in fact primitive putsches to derail and subvert the real tide of a revolutionary tide that can erupt from below. The serious strategists of capital can feel the heat of this seething revolt underneath the surface. They are terrified of a volcanic explosion of society. Once that class struggle erupts with a Marxist leadership it will be unstoppable; the state, clergy and the political elite will be swept away. The capitalist, landlord and imperialist stranglehold shall be obliterated. It will break this boisterous stagnation and society will surge ahead towards a socialist victory. 

[x]

What we’re seeing unfolding in Pakistan right now may be an engineered military coup or the army propping up the political puppets that will most closely cater to its interests and appease the severely agitated people. The state police feel threatened by the organized protesters in their tens and thousands and react in police brutality. The economy has suffered under Nawaz, Pakistan has come into the yoke of the IMF and the energy crisis is neverending. The military has already become involved as a so-called ‘mediator’ when in reality it possesses foremost control over the situation because it is the most powerful institution in Pakistani society. Pro-Musharraf and dictatorship people have already come out of the woodwork and are calling for army intervention. In the end, the people lose. For them, both openly military and democratic regimes are exploitative, murderous and oppressive. Keep the average working class Pakistani foremost in mind whenever you blog, tweet, or post about this. They’re the ones who are most adversely affected by this, and they’re the ones paying for it with their lives.

  5:18 pm, reblogged  by apistat-chaekoos, [ 1,037 notes ]


snarkbender:

friendshipandlabor:

US debate over gun control is such a farce 

conservatives want white people to have guns to patrol the streets for unarmed black teenagers

liberals want guns to stay safely in the hands of cops and soldiers =)

WELL WHEN YOU PUT IT THAT WAY

  5:09 pm, reblogged  by apistat-chaekoos, [ 1,423 notes ]


idonttakemycontactsout said: i appreciate your concern, but at my college we interact a great deal with autism speaks and support it. you shouldn't focus on what they're doing wrong, because none of it is terrible, but focus on what they are trying to do for people with all different levels of autism.

autisticfandomthings:

Things you apparently don’t consider terrible:

Posting a video of a mother talking about how she wanted to kill her child while that same child  was in the room listening. 

Supporting the eugenic abortion of autistic people.

Failing to condemn the murders of autistic children.

Supporting the Judge Rotenburg Center, which according the the UN, tortures autistic people.

It is terrible, only 3% of their budget goes towards services, there are no autistic people on their board, they literally support eugenics. They are doing absolutely nothing good. 

This is widely know withing the autistic community and they are pretty universally hated by autistic people. Because they are terrible. They only even bother pretending to care about little white boys.

http://goldenheartedrose.tumblr.com/A$

Read that link. Read it.

And here is the resignation letter of the sole autistic person they had in an important (but still non board) position

http://jerobison.blogspot.ca/2013/11/i-resign-my-roles-at-autism-speaks.html

Here’s a flyer by a major autism advocacy organisation on them

https://autisticadvocacy.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Autism_Speaks_Flyer.pdf

OR, if you still don’t give a fuck about what autistic people think or want, (which seems kind of obvious from the content of this ask) here are some links written by non autistic people.

Here’s a post from the CEO of one of the oldest charities in the US for intellectually and developmentally disabled people. 

http://blog.thearc.org/2013/11/16/open-letter-suzanne-wright-co-founder-autism-speaks/


Here’s a post from a major autism parenting magazine

http://www.autismparentingmagazine.com/issue-14-asd-options-living-independently/#.U_-CfPldWMM


And here are some other posts

http://smallbutkindamighty.com/2013/04/02/why-i-dont-support-autism-speaks-which-is-why-i-dont-light-it-up-blue/

http://emmashopebook.com/2013/11/13/whats-wrong-with-autism-speaks/

If you continue to support them now you are in possession of this information, then it is clear that you are not an ally to autistic people, you don’t want to help us, and are probably just doing your charity work for “oh look at me, I’m a good person” points.

If you support autism speaks, you are not supporting autistic people, you are hurting us. And you are doing it knowingly and consciously.

Please spread this, not enough people know.

  5:08 pm, reblogged  by apistat-chaekoos, [ 3,991 notes ]


  4:37 pm, reblogged  by apistat-chaekoos, [ 6,538 notes ]


 

The song recounts a specific sexual assault (“One of the most shattering experiences of my life,” Grimes, who was born in Vancouver as Claire Boucher, told SPIN in 2012) by describing the psychic fallout: “And never walk about after dark/ It’s my point of view/ Because someone could break your neck/ Coming up behind you always coming and you’d never have a clue,” she lisps in her high, pinched voice. It’s a dazzling, paralyzing performance, in part because Boucher sounds almost playful, and in part because the skronking behind her—the song’s springy, propulsive synth line was one of 2012’s most unforgettable—indicates something other than victimization. “See you on a dark night,” Boucher repeats. […] But what “Oblivion” ultimately offers is victory. It’s the sound of one woman turning personal devastation into not just a career-making single, but a lasting anthem of transformation.

Grimes’ Oblivion is the best song of the decade - so far.

(Source: ozhin)

  2:25 pm, reblogged  by apistat-chaekoos, [ 17,556 notes ]


tagged: [doge bloge]
  2:23 pm, reblogged  by apistat-chaekoos, [ 4,036 notes ]


atane:

zuky:

nezua:

Flappers shaming Miley Cyrus.

Oddly enough we could say that Miley Cyrus is following solidly in the appropriative footsteps of white flappers, who in the 1920s grabbed national attention and stirred alarmism concerning the end of civilization because they partied to Black music, wore their hair short like Josephine Baker (who fled US racism to become a superstar in Europe), and imitated dance moves from Baker and other Black dancers. The famously flapperesque Charleston was lifted from the African American dance called the Juba, which had West African roots and was danced in secret in the South and the Caribbean. The dance sped up when it reached Harlem, giving birth to both tap dancing and the Broadway hit called The Charleston, which spread like wildfire from there. White people didn’t sway their hips this scandalously prior to that era, making flappers roughly equivalent to white twerkers of the Jazz Age.

This is 100% true. The period from the jazz age to the beat generation, comparatively speaking was the height of cultural appropriation of black art. The beat generation used lingo popularized by Lester Young. They then appropriated the style, dress, and lingo of bebop musicians like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, down to the beret, glasses, and soul patch. Bebop musicians, Parker and Gillespie in particular, were the blueprint of their image. Norman Mailer wrote an essay titled “The White Negro" that tackles this phenomenon. I’m no fan of Norman Mailer, but at least he admitted that white people were stealing from blacks. He wrote it in 1957.
With regards to the flappers, apart from Josephine Baker, they also liberally borrowed from black vaudeville performers. They would copy dance moves from black performers, and then introduce it as their own. Many dances attributed to whites are from black vaudeville performers who were forced to perform on the chitlin’ circuit because of segregation and Jim Crow laws.
It really is astonishing how nothing has changed in this regard. For example, people to this day still call Benny Goodman “the king of swing”, when what he did was procure charts for arrangements from Fletcher Henderson, a black man. Goodman’s biggest hits were from Henderson. It’s amazing how much credit Goodman gets for another man’s work. Of course Goodman became “the king of swing”, while Fletcher Henderson remains a footnote in history. How a white man becomes the king of something innovated by blacks is astounding. Benny Goodman is called “the king of swing”. Paul Whiteman is called “the king of jazz”. Elvis Presley is called “the king of rock n roll”. Is Eminem the king of rap? What about Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke with r&b? Miley is soon on her way to become “the queen of twerking”.
Anyway, apart from getting his charts from Fletcher Henderson, Benny Goodman got his ass handed to him by Chick Webb at the Savoy Ballroom when they had a battle of the bands. Goodman is often noted as being one of the few white men in the segregation era to have black men in his band, and the narrative is typically presented as if he did it out of benevolence. He did it because there was no way to get around the fact that swing music was the domain of black folks, and he poached the best black players he could find to bolster his band, and black musicians went with him because as a white man, he was able to pay them more than black bandleaders, and they wouldn’t have to deal with indignity while traveling. Many hotels refused black bands, so they often had to sleep in cars, bus terminals, or crash at the homes of hospitable blacks. A big portion of Duke Ellington’s money went towards renting out train cars and making sure his orchestra had a place to sleep while on the road because hotels often turned them down because they were black. These were issues Goodman wasn’t going to face. Black musicians certainly didn’t go with him because he was the best. Goodman even later hired Henderson to arrange and play in his band. He wasn’t doing it because he loved black people. Black people were the ones creating and innovating. Where else would he get the best charts and arrangements? Now that the smoke has cleared and the dust has settled, Goodman gets all the credit. Funny how that works.
This stuff has been going on for a long time. Miley is the 2013 version. Twerking has been around for a long time, but Miley convulses on national tv and all of a sudden, dictionary definitions of twerking are made. Definitions complete with no mention of black people, like all this happened in a vacuum. It’s history repeating itself over and over again. I see the same thing happening with afrobeat music.

atane:

zuky:

nezua:

Flappers shaming Miley Cyrus.

Oddly enough we could say that Miley Cyrus is following solidly in the appropriative footsteps of white flappers, who in the 1920s grabbed national attention and stirred alarmism concerning the end of civilization because they partied to Black music, wore their hair short like Josephine Baker (who fled US racism to become a superstar in Europe), and imitated dance moves from Baker and other Black dancers. The famously flapperesque Charleston was lifted from the African American dance called the Juba, which had West African roots and was danced in secret in the South and the Caribbean. The dance sped up when it reached Harlem, giving birth to both tap dancing and the Broadway hit called The Charleston, which spread like wildfire from there. White people didn’t sway their hips this scandalously prior to that era, making flappers roughly equivalent to white twerkers of the Jazz Age.

This is 100% true. The period from the jazz age to the beat generation, comparatively speaking was the height of cultural appropriation of black art. The beat generation used lingo popularized by Lester Young. They then appropriated the style, dress, and lingo of bebop musicians like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, down to the beret, glasses, and soul patch. Bebop musicians, Parker and Gillespie in particular, were the blueprint of their image. Norman Mailer wrote an essay titled “The White Negro" that tackles this phenomenon. I’m no fan of Norman Mailer, but at least he admitted that white people were stealing from blacks. He wrote it in 1957.

With regards to the flappers, apart from Josephine Baker, they also liberally borrowed from black vaudeville performers. They would copy dance moves from black performers, and then introduce it as their own. Many dances attributed to whites are from black vaudeville performers who were forced to perform on the chitlin’ circuit because of segregation and Jim Crow laws.

It really is astonishing how nothing has changed in this regard. For example, people to this day still call Benny Goodman “the king of swing”, when what he did was procure charts for arrangements from Fletcher Henderson, a black man. Goodman’s biggest hits were from Henderson. It’s amazing how much credit Goodman gets for another man’s work. Of course Goodman became “the king of swing”, while Fletcher Henderson remains a footnote in history. How a white man becomes the king of something innovated by blacks is astounding. Benny Goodman is called “the king of swing”. Paul Whiteman is called “the king of jazz”. Elvis Presley is called “the king of rock n roll”. Is Eminem the king of rap? What about Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke with r&b? Miley is soon on her way to become “the queen of twerking”.

Anyway, apart from getting his charts from Fletcher Henderson, Benny Goodman got his ass handed to him by Chick Webb at the Savoy Ballroom when they had a battle of the bands. Goodman is often noted as being one of the few white men in the segregation era to have black men in his band, and the narrative is typically presented as if he did it out of benevolence. He did it because there was no way to get around the fact that swing music was the domain of black folks, and he poached the best black players he could find to bolster his band, and black musicians went with him because as a white man, he was able to pay them more than black bandleaders, and they wouldn’t have to deal with indignity while traveling. Many hotels refused black bands, so they often had to sleep in cars, bus terminals, or crash at the homes of hospitable blacks. A big portion of Duke Ellington’s money went towards renting out train cars and making sure his orchestra had a place to sleep while on the road because hotels often turned them down because they were black. These were issues Goodman wasn’t going to face. Black musicians certainly didn’t go with him because he was the best. Goodman even later hired Henderson to arrange and play in his band. He wasn’t doing it because he loved black people. Black people were the ones creating and innovating. Where else would he get the best charts and arrangements? Now that the smoke has cleared and the dust has settled, Goodman gets all the credit. Funny how that works.

This stuff has been going on for a long time. Miley is the 2013 version. Twerking has been around for a long time, but Miley convulses on national tv and all of a sudden, dictionary definitions of twerking are made. Definitions complete with no mention of black people, like all this happened in a vacuum. It’s history repeating itself over and over again. I see the same thing happening with afrobeat music.

(Source: melanskyyworld)

  2:14 pm, reblogged  by apistat-chaekoos, [ 46,115 notes ]